The Horn Section

 

They may not toot their own hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed., but some animals have really cool ones—hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. that is!  And they come in all different shapes and sizes. Some grow in spirals, like on a male greater kudu, and others, such as those you’ll find on a gemsbok, stay straight.

 

HornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. can be long: the Ankole cattle’s can be 8 feet from horn tip to horn tip! They can also stay short, like the anoa’s. Why would one horn be different than another? A lot of it has to do with where the animalAny living thing that is not a plant. Most animals can move about freely. All use plants or other animals as food. All have sensory organs. lives. Animals are adapted to their habitats. If an anoa, which lives in forests, had long hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed., they might get tangled in low tree branches. And other horned animals, like the giant eland and the oryx, use theirs for sparring and to look bigger—so wouldn’t they need bigger, longer hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed.?

 

For a look at another animalAny living thing that is not a plant. Most animals can move about freely. All use plants or other animals as food. All have sensory organs. with impressive hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed., check out this month’s video and meet the Cape buffalo. It has hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. that look like a helmet—and they don’t even ride bikes or play football!