Mammal

Greater kudu

Area: 
Chad, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Botswana Namibia, and South Africa
Habitat: 
Woodlands
Food: 
Leaves, grass, fruit, and flowers
Size: 
Body is 6 to 8 feet long, stand 3 to 5 feet tall at shoulder; males are larger than females.
Babies: 
For the first 3 to 4 weeks of its life, a calf stays hidden, curled up among plants.
By the time they are done growing, a kudu’s horns have 3 full turns.
Huge HornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed.

 

 

Greater kudu are a large type of antelope. It’s easy to tell males from females—only the guys have hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed.! The huge hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. of an adult male can reach 4 1/2 feet in length. During the breeding season, males lock hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. and wrestle to establish territory. Notice how the hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. sweep backwards? Greater kudus live in wooded areas, so having hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed. that don’t stick out  helps keep them from getting tangled in branches.

 

Female greater kudu don’t have hornsGrowths on the head of an antelope, cow, sheep, or goat that are never shed., but they don’t need them! These antelope live in groups of about 25 animals. If a predatorAn animal that hunts and kills other animals for its food. like a lion, leopard, or hunting dog comes near, the kudus make an alarm call and the whole herdA group of animals that travels and feeds together. runs away.