Mammal

Arctic Fox

Area: 
Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, northern Europe, and Russia
Habitat: 
Tundra
Food: 
Lemmings, voles, squirrels, small birds, eggs, berries, and fish
Size: 
18- to 26-inch long body; tail is about 13 inches long
Babies: 
A litter of 6 to 12 pups are born in a den.
Arctic foxes often follow polar bears to eat their leftovers.

Small, round body with thick fur and a cute fluffy tail—everything about an Arctic fox helps it survive its cold, harsh habitatWhere an animal or plant normally lives and grows.. Even the bottom of its paws have hair to give the fox good traction as it races across icy ground. But for an Arctic fox the tail, also called a "brush," is extra useful, since the fox curls it around the face like a scarf when the frigid winds blow.

 

An Arctic fox’s fur changes colors with the seasons of the year. In winter, it is white so that it blends in with the snow. During the spring, the fox sheds its winter coat, revealing gray fur underneath. Some Arctic foxes have coats that are always very pale, while others that live along rocky shorelines might have more brown in their summer coat.  

 

Arctic foxes have a great sense of smell and excellent hearing. Their small, pointy ears can hear their preyNoun: An animal that is hunted as food by another animal. Verb: To attempt to take an animal for food. moving around in underground tunnels. When an Arctic fox hears its next meal scurrying under the snow, it leaps into the air and pounces, breaking through the layer of snow right onto the preyNoun: An animal that is hunted as food by another animal. Verb: To attempt to take an animal for food. underneath.